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Year of the Rat Puppet and Lantern Activities

Written by jack121400
| 2 MIN READ

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As a parent or carer, we can spend a significant amount of time (over?!) thinking the best way to talk to our kids about their report cards. Whether you have one child in the early stages of formal schooling or siblings across multiple grades, report cards are a great way to start a conversation about their learning. So, what is the best way to talk about report cards?

1. Take Time One-on-One

As a parent or carer, we can spend a significant amount of time (over?!) thinking the best way to talk to our kids about their report cards. Whether you have one child in the early stages of formal schooling or siblings across multiple grades, report cards are a great way to start a conversation about their learning. So, what is the best way to talk about report cards?

2. Focus on Effort Over Grades

Most report cards provide a grade for effort as well as grades for academic achievement. An effort mark is by far one of the most important aspects of every child’s report! It is the aspect of their schooling that they have the most direct control over.

Help your child understand that everyone is different. Everyone excels (and struggles) in different areas. Try to avoid comparisons between their report card and their siblings’ or classmates’ reports. Instead, focus on where they have tried their best, as well as the learning areas in which they achieved well or made a great improvement in.

4. Consider Setting an Individual Learning Goal

There’s a huge amount of value in taking time to sit with your child, reflect upon their current report card and then set an individual learning goal for the next term or semester.

Help your child understand that everyone is different. Everyone excels (and struggles) in different areas. Try to avoid comparisons between their report card and their siblings’ or classmates’ reports. Instead, focus on where they have tried their best, as well as the learning areas in which they achieved well or made a great improvement in.

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